Ads Worth Spreading

TED has named the 10 winners in its inaugural “Ads Worth Spreading” contest.

Selected from more than 1,000 submissions from around the world, they are some of the most creative, compelling and out-of-the-box communications of the past year. The winners are a quite diverse group — from major agencies to tiny boutiques to college students and non-profits, hailing from around the world. TED curator Chris Anderson says of the ads:

We’re seeking to reverse the trend of ads being aggressively forced on users. We want to nurture ads so good you choose to watch – and share. On TED.com, ads run after our talks, not before. As well as avoiding the annoyance of interruption, this positioning means they can run longer than the TV-standard 30-seconds. And that’s the key — in 2-3 minutes, there’s more time to tell a story, share an idea, make an authentic human connection. These winning ads, many of them long-form, powerfully demonstrate these strengths. We think they represent an exciting new way for companies to engage with the world in the internet age.”

I especially like these two quirky ads:

And of course this Intel ad, which I’ve posted on my blog earlier, is very nice too.

But I really don’t understand why the one below was included. It’s suppose to be about “bringing ideas to life” and this is all they came up with? It displays lack on imagination and it’s quite uninspiring, if you ask me. For example, having the trains and cars act like Transformers is more like bringing (bad) old ideas back from the dead. What’s more, they try to amaze us with cars driving fast, also a quite used-up idea.

See them all, as well as the 14 runners up, here.

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